Mark V 90 watt setup observations

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timothymartin220

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Some of the biggest observations i can make about the MArk V 90 watt is that the per channel volume is much more than a volume knob. I find that it works a lot like the presence knob in that it helps locate where the sound comes from. When it is below noon, the sound becomes scooped and hollow,(it also seems to shove the sound to the back of my cab) clearing up a LOT of room in the midrange, no matter how you have it EQ'ed this happens. When you turn the volume over noon (this is the per channel volume next to the channel gain knob, this is also using the loop and master volume) the mids fill in and become more present. I run a 4x12 cab and the way it sounds is like the mids have slid forward in the cab to come to the front of the amp and REALLY become present. Also above noon on the volume you add distortion( gritty kind of grunting distortion that raunches and loosens up the sound)...the presence really does bring the sound up and make it diffuse. High presence gives a surround type effect and low presence fires the sound straight out of the center of the cab. (I have never seen anyone discuss this aspect of the Mark V and I feel it is important to know!!!)
Also one of my most recent discoveries is that when using the Mark 2c+ mode I always thought it a little overboard at high gain settings and lost its punch at lower gain settings. The one reason I loved the earlier amps was the input gain, you could make a solid tone with not too high an input that Really had punch and clarity (with a ton of distortion as the main gain was at 8-10) yet not that lead singing over 8 on the input tone that THIS Mark is set up for. Recently I began experimenting with my guitars volume and found that while you cannot drop the input gain, you can leave the amp turned up to a gain you would not use for rhythm but would for leads, then roll back the volume a touch and you get the same sound like lowering the input gain on a Studio pre or other Mark amp. This discovery kind of changed my whole relationship with this amp and I now love it more than my Triaxis. I have also discovered that this amp LOVES gold lion 12ax7's...and is a **** candidate for tube rolling...you wont get much bang for your buck rolling one or two tubes, no matter which ones you choose.....roll all tubes to another brand for your best bang, and like I said, they are HELLA expensive but this amp loves em...Gold Lion 12ax7, the russian ones...gold plated(I didnt choose them because of the gold plating but the manufacture type)..My Tiraxis by far prefers the Mesa SPAX7's (The condom wrapped JJ premium 12ax7).
 
Some of the biggest observations i can make about the MArk V 90 watt is that the per channel volume is much more than a volume knob. I find that it works a lot like the presence knob in that it helps locate where the sound comes from. When it is below noon, the sound becomes scooped and hollow,(it also seems to shove the sound to the back of my cab) clearing up a LOT of room in the midrange, no matter how you have it EQ'ed this happens. When you turn the volume over noon (this is the per channel volume next to the channel gain knob, this is also using the loop and master volume) the mids fill in and become more present. I run a 4x12 cab and the way it sounds is like the mids have slid forward in the cab to come to the front of the amp and REALLY become present. Also above noon on the volume you add distortion( gritty kind of grunting distortion that raunches and loosens up the sound)...the presence really does bring the sound up and make it diffuse. High presence gives a surround type effect and low presence fires the sound straight out of the center of the cab. (I have never seen anyone discuss this aspect of the Mark V and I feel it is important to know!!!)
Also one of my most recent discoveries is that when using the Mark 2c+ mode I always thought it a little overboard at high gain settings and lost its punch at lower gain settings. The one reason I loved the earlier amps was the input gain, you could make a solid tone with not too high an input that Really had punch and clarity (with a ton of distortion as the main gain was at 8-10) yet not that lead singing over 8 on the input tone that THIS Mark is set up for. Recently I began experimenting with my guitars volume and found that while you cannot drop the input gain, you can leave the amp turned up to a gain you would not use for rhythm but would for leads, then roll back the volume a touch and you get the same sound like lowering the input gain on a Studio pre or other Mark amp. This discovery kind of changed my whole relationship with this amp and I now love it more than my Triaxis. I have also discovered that this amp LOVES gold lion 12ax7's...and is a **** candidate for tube rolling...you wont get much bang for your buck rolling one or two tubes, no matter which ones you choose.....roll all tubes to another brand for your best bang, and like I said, they are HELLA expensive but this amp loves em...Gold Lion 12ax7, the russian ones...gold plated(I didnt choose them because of the gold plating but the manufacture type)..My Tiraxis by far prefers the Mesa SPAX7's (The condom wrapped JJ premium 12ax7).

Can you explain the “using the loop and master volume“ part, specifically the ”loop”. I have seen other references to volume and the loop but I am not sure what this is referencing. I don’t use the loop for anything.
 
I can, the loop is the effects loop. There is a switch on the back that engages the loop for use or cuts it out completely. When you are NOT using the loop there is no master volume on this amp. The channel volumes become the output volume control (the volume knobs on EACH channel).
When the loop is active the channel volumes become somewhat of a per channel leveler and the master volume (located on the right side of the amp by the solo volume control ) becomes active and handles the overall output of the amp (the solo switch is also active when you use the "Loop"). Some hate using the Master volume as they feel the extra tube this puts in line makes the amp more compressed and less open...I do not subscribe to this line of thought...I feel it gives you MASSIVE tuning options for the sound of your amp as volume effects overall tone. Also turning up the volume control to past noon gives you a different tone than if you run the channel volume low enough for home use (The mid blooms past noon and the amp becomes so much more PRESENT in a mix...to my ears)...get that per channel volume up, the only way is with the loop engaged and running the master volume. Hope this explanation helps! (try putting an eq in the loop and use it instead of the onboard, or maybe use an effect?) (All those amps you have listed and you have no idea what the effects loop is and how to use it?) Low channel volume and the sound is kinda mid scooped, mid level channel volume and you get a more pronounced mid hump...high channel volume and you get a sizzle and extra distortion that is NOT there at lower channel volumes...this amp has MORE distortion and you are NOT accessing it without using the higher channel volume at lower output (Master volume low)
 
I know what the effects loop is, just wasn’t sure of the association with the master volume. I just read the passage in the manual about the effect loop and checked what my Mark V was set to, which is Active. I have had the Mark V for whole day now.

thanks for the explanation.
 
I can, the loop is the effects loop. There is a switch on the back that engages the loop for use or cuts it out completely. When you are NOT using the loop there is no master volume on this amp. The channel volumes become the output volume control (the volume knobs on EACH channel).
When the loop is active the channel volumes become somewhat of a per channel leveler and the master volume (located on the right side of the amp by the solo volume control ) becomes active and handles the overall output of the amp (the solo switch is also active when you use the "Loop"). Some hate using the Master volume as they feel the extra tube this puts in line makes the amp more compressed and less open...I do not subscribe to this line of thought...I feel it gives you MASSIVE tuning options for the sound of your amp as volume effects overall tone. Also turning up the volume control to past noon gives you a different tone than if you run the channel volume low enough for home use (The mid blooms past noon and the amp becomes so much more PRESENT in a mix...to my ears)...get that per channel volume up, the only way is with the loop engaged and running the master volume. Hope this explanation helps! (try putting an eq in the loop and use it instead of the onboard, or maybe use an effect?) (All those amps you have listed and you have no idea what the effects loop is and how to use it?) Low channel volume and the sound is kinda mid scooped, mid level channel volume and you get a more pronounced mid hump...high channel volume and you get a sizzle and extra distortion that is NOT there at lower channel volumes...this amp has MORE distortion and you are NOT accessing it without using the higher channel volume at lower output (Master volume low)
Where you are talking about the vol control changing past noon - do you mean the channel masters or the Loop vol? do you mean to crank the master for each channel - making the power tubes sing, and then bringing it down to non ear bleed vols with the loop volume - labelled output on the front above solo? Sorry if it's just me being thick but I got confused with you using master volume interchangeably for both channel masters and output knob.
 

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